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Hobart Nurses' Conference

  • : Hobart TAS 7000

Every year Ausmed Education holds a Nurses’ Conference specifically designed for your location aimed at assisting you to get rapidly up-to-date on current nursing topics. Attend this local nurses’ conference to gain a broad range of clinical and professional updates relevant to your practice. Take time out and network with like-minded colleagues. Find out:

  • What are some of the health priorities that you need to know about?
  • What nursing interventions make a difference especially to those with chronic conditions?
  • Why is evidence so important to the way you practice?
  • The latest information about a range of current treatments
Schedule Day One

8:30AM REGISTRATION FOR DAY ONE


9:00

Craig Maloney

Getting “Buy-In” from Your Patients

Many nurses feel a shared sense of frustration that, despite the health education they can provide, patients resist taking advice and making changes to their health. Are we going about health promotion in the wrong way? Are our needs being met rather than our patients? Sometimes we may be too eager to provide useful, practical tips to our patients. Despite our best intentions, are we failing to see what matters most to our patients? Is it time to use our reputation as one of the most trusted professions to go back to basics and build a meaningful relationship with our patients? From here, anything is possible, right? Let’s discuss:

  • The power of unconditional positive regard
  • How to actually be non-judgmental (we’re all guilty)
  • Keeping goal setting and rewards simple
  • Motivational interviewing and how to know if your patient is ready to change their behaviour

9:45

Terri-Lee Cooper

Locally Advanced and Metastatic Breast Cancer

Locally advanced breast cancer is invasive breast cancer that has features relating to size and spread. However, metastatic breast cancer is sometimes referred to as advanced or secondary cancer. In this session, we will discuss:

  • The difference between locally advanced and metastatic breast cancers
  • Signs and symptoms of each type
  • Latest statistical facts and figures
  • Treatment and management options for each type

10:30 MORNING TEA


11:00

Dr Michelle Woods

Newly Diagnosed Diabetes? How Nurses Can Help

A person who has recently been diagnosed with diabetes is often confused and worried. They may seek information from many sources which may help. However, professional face-to-face communication is essential in these early days. This session looks at the common issues that face a person who is newly diagnosed with diabetes, which websites are credible and can help, and includes:

  • Should you recommend self-monitoring of blood glucose?
  • What dietary advice should you give if they like to eat potatoes in the evening?
  • Should you advise a person to increase exercise if they are slim?

12:00

Tammy Harvey

Getting It Right: Assessment of Older People

Sometime in 2018, Clint Eastwood will be 88 and Jane Fonda will be 81. Do you associate these people with the patients in your practice setting who are the same age? Hospital admissions for older Australians are rising rapidly with most over 70 years old, and this will continue as the population ages. Unfortunately, we live in an ageist society where treatment options and decisions may be offered or limited based on age rather than physical condition and quality of life. Assessment of the older person can be tricky. Using case studies in this practical and dynamic session, we will explore:

  • What are the physiological changes related to the ageing process?
  • What are the commonly missed clues in the assessment of older people and why they are missed?
  • What is an age-appropriate assessment?
  • When short of time, what should you NOT miss in your assessment?

1:00PM LUNCH AND NETWORKING


2:00

Jane Davis

Osteoporosis: Not Just About the Elderly…

There are a large number of people in Australia with osteoporosis. These people are more prone to fractures because of the pathophysiology of the condition. In this session, we will discuss:

  • Can osteoporosis be prevented?
  • Why is minimal trauma fracture more prevalent in this group?
  • What does “bone re-modelling” mean?
  • What is the current treatment for osteoporosis?

3:00 AFTERNOON TEA


3:30

Leanne Smart

Delirium: See It, Say It - Care of the Delirious Patient in Acute Care

Delirium is an acute change in mental status that is common amongst older patients in hospital. The burden is high and associated with increased morbidity and mortality, yet despite it being a serious condition, delirium remains poorly recognised. This session aims to improve your confidence in the assessment and management of delirium in the acute care setting, while introducing the work of the Australian Safety Commission. This session includes:

  • The burden of delirium
  • Delirium risk factors
  • Early detection - signs of delirium and the role of nursing assessment
  • Can delirium be prevented?
  • Nursing management of delirium and associated behaviours
  • Introduction to the delirium clinical care standard

4:30 CLOSE OF DAY ONE OF CONFERENCE


Day Two

9:00AM COMMENCEMENT OF DAY TWO


9:00

Dr Fran McInerney

The Complexity of Dementia: One Size Does Not Fit All

Dementia is an incurable condition that affects around 30% of people over the age of 85. The second leading cause of death of Australian adults, even when medically diagnosed this condition attracts stigmatisation and is considered hopeless. A superior understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of dementia contributes to quality care for those with the condition, as well as their family or carers. This session will provide an update on the pathophysiology of dementia and include:

  • How many types of dementia have been classified and described?
  • What are the differentiating factors between the various types of dementia?
  • What are some of the screening processes required for dementia?
  • Is there a treatment for dementia?

9:45

Helen Krupp

Medication Update: Existing and New Oral Anticoagulants

Medications remain one of the cornerstones of preventing and treating blood clots. Medicines that affect the blood and prevent clotting are frequently administered by nurses, yet there are many potential complications of usage. Understanding the mechanism of these regularly used medicines is paramount to providing safe patient care. This session will review some important clinical considerations, including the use of reversal agents associated with these medicines. This session discusses:

  • Antiplatelet agents, e.g. aspirin, clopidogrel
  • Anticoagulant agents, e.g. warfarin
  • Evidence for novel classes of anticoagulants

10:30 MORNING TEA


11:00

Jane Bradshaw

As Easy as ABC: Hepatitis: The Forgotten Disease

Hepatitis affects approximately 1085 million people worldwide (WHO 2014). Nearly a quarter of a million Australians live with hepatitis C, of whom 25% have chronic liver disease. Hepatitis is a serious concern for all nurses as they are likely to encounter patients with this condition. This session discusses:

  • Morbidity and mortality: what's the reality?
  • Who is vulnerable, an update on transmission, and how is it prevented?
  • What is new about our knowledge of these diseases?
  • What are the aims of modern treatment?

12:00

Lea Young

Chronic Wound Management: What Works?

Most nurses encounter wounds in their practice. However, the nature of wound management continues to confound many nurses especially due to the ever-increasing range of treatments available, including dressings. This session looks at chronic wound management and includes:

  • How does the aetiology of chronic wounds differ to acute wounds?
  • How can you manage a chronic wound that has become infected?
  • Is it possible to reignite healing in a chronic wound?

1:00PM LUNCH AND NETWORKING


2:00

Craig Maloney

The Nurse Health Coach

Are you someone who gets a real kick out of seeing a patient have an “ah-ha!” moment? Do you have an amazing ability to connect well with patients? Have you ever thought about putting your talents to good use and becoming a health coach? We wear many different hats in our role as nurses, and health coaching is now seen as an increasing part of nursing and a potential new horizon for nurses to explore professionally. This session will open your mind to the possibility of being a “nurse health coach” and how you can apply your passion for your patients to help guide them towards better health.

3:00 AFTERNOON TEA


3:30

Craig Maloney

Promoting Holistic Healthcare Practice in Nurses

Nurses spend their shifts caring for others, often in highly charged and emotional situations, and can forget to look after themselves. This session discusses:

  • What is compassion fatigue?
  • What is compassion, satisfaction, and burnout?
  • How can you enhance emotional wellbeing through self-care?
  • Should emotional wellbeing be considered part of professional development?
  • How can you sustain wellbeing across the day to go home healthy?

4:30 CLOSE OF CONFERENCE AND EVALUATIONS


The Goal Need for Program

In regard to the nursing care you provide, the need to continually seek new information is a given no matter where you work. Nursing safety and quality are essential and both are directly linked to knowledge. This is a time when:

  • Healthcare budgets are under increased stress
  • The community purse is shrinking
  • Quality outcomes are now the goal of all care

Now more than ever, if safe, quality outcomes are to be achieved, it is important that you take a leadership role in providing outcome focused high-value care. This can be done by addressing emerging gaps in your knowledge through up-to-date information.

Purpose of Program

This program provides you with current knowledge, relating to a range of professional and clinical practice topics that will improve how you provide holistic nursing care.

Your learning outcomes:

People with health risks will receive preventative nursing action in your care to avoid illness

Better patient outcomes will be achieved through the application of up-to-date knowledge related to specific nursing interventions

Interprofessional collaboration will be optimised to enhance patient outcomes

Patient outcomes will be underpinned by evidence-based practice, recognised standards, and guidelines

Presenters

Craig Maloney

Craig Maloney

Craig Maloney has a master of mental health nursing and graduate qualifications in child and adolescent mental health, group work, ...Read More

Terri-Lee Cooper

Terri-Lee Cooper

In 2012, Terri began working with Cancer Screening and Control Services. In 2014 she was appointed to the position of ... Read More

Michelle Woods

Michelle Woods

Michelle Woods completed her Doctorate of Nursing and Master of Science Nursing (Nurse Practitioner) at the University of Colorado with ... Read More

Tammy Harvey

Tammy Harvey

Tammy Harvey is the current chair of the Tasmanian Australian College of Nurse Practitioners. Tammy has experience in policy and ... Read More

Jane Davis

Jane Davis

In 2010, after 10 years of working as a clinical nurse consultant in the department of geriatrics at the Royal ... Read More

Leanne Smart

Leanne Smart

Leanne Smart works in aged services as the clinical nurse consultant at the Royal Hobart Hospital. She has spent seven ... Read More

Fran McInerney

Fran McInerney

Fran McInerney is a professor of dementia studies and education at the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre at the ... Read More

Jane Bradshaw

Jane Bradshaw

Jane Bradshaw is a Registered Nurse currently working as the hepatology nurse at The Royal Hobart Hospital where she has ...Read More

Lea Young

Lea Young

Lea has worked as a Nurse Practitioner: Wound Management for the Tasmanian Health Service, Southern Region since 2013. Prior to ... Read More

Helen Krupp

Helen Krupp

Since graduating pharmacy in 2001, Helen has worked in a variety of roles within pharmacy, primarily as a hospital pharmacist ... Read More

Title
Hobart Nurses' Conference
Speciality Classification
Interest Areas
-- GENERAL --
Location
Type
Delivery
Provider Type
RTO
Duration
11 hours
Start Date
28-May-2018
End Date
29-May-2018
CPD
11 hours
Price Details
$590.00 (two days)
Location
Hobart TAS 7000
Venue
Best Western Hobart, 156 Bathurst Street
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Contact Phone
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