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Nursing Adults Aged 85+ Conference

  • : Surry Hills NSW 2010

Increasing numbers of people are living beyond 85 years of age and this population is set to grow substantially over the next few decades. This will have profound implications on the way you, as a nurse, provide care. Are you ready for an even larger older population? Are your nursing skills required to care for the adult aged 85+ up-to-date? Attend this conference and learn:

  • What is trauma-informed care of the older adult?
  • How do normal age-related changes correspond to behavioural changes?
  • Is it really dementia?
  • What do you do when wounds won’t heal?
  • Is oxygen therapy in the older adult always required?
  • Can the microvascular complications of diabetes be diverted?
  • How can you prevent hospital readmission and much, much more…

Schedule Day One

8:30AM REGISTRATION FOR DAY ONE


9:00

Welcome and Introduction to Conference

9:05

Mike Smith

Trauma-Informed Care with Older Adults

Understanding the impact of adverse childhood events and cumulative stressors throughout a life is essential if we are to create a safe environment that promotes resilience and enables healing for older adults. The origins of trauma-informed care stem from a large study which investigated the correlation between adverse childhood events (ACE) and long-term health problems later in life. This session explores:

  • What is a trauma-informed approach to care of the older adult?
  • How do adverse childhood events increase the risk of long-term health complications?
  • What are the effects of chronic stress and trauma in older adults?
  • How does trauma-informed care respect the person as the centre of care?
  • How can nurses incorporate a trauma-informed approach to their care?

10:00

Wendy Bryant

Preventing Complications of Diabetes in the Older Adult

The microvascular complications of diabetes are profound and have debilitating effects on a person’s quality of life. Diabetes education and patient self-management at any age are essential to avoid and divert chronic complications. This session looks at how these complications can be prevented in older adults. It will focus on nursing strategies to divert the following conditions:

  • Diabetic neuropathy
  • Retinopathy
  • Nephropathy

11:00 MORNING TEA


11:30

TBA

Not Just over 85 ... Delirium and Other Cognitive Changes in the Adult Aged 65+

According to the AIHW 2015-16 report in Australia’s hospitals almost half of patient days in hospital are occupied by people aged over 65 years. It is a misconception that cognitive changes only occur in older adults aged 85+. As such, this session provides an important opportunity to consider a much broader population who are also at risk. It will explain the following:

  • What are the health related changes that might cause a new confusion?
  • How can we assess what the cause of delirium or a cognitive change is?
  • Why is it important to consider consider delirium in any hospitalised adult, not just those over 85?
  • When might we need to consider referral to an Aged Care Assessment Team?

12:15

Gary Bain

Pressure Injuries – Pathophysiology, Prevention, and Promotion of Recovery

Older individuals, along with those who are debilitated or acutely unwell, are at risk of injury associated with the elements of pressure, shear, and microclimate. Understanding how these forces combine to cause the destructive effects of tissue and cellular distortion is key in designing a plan of care that either prevents injury, contains it, or maximises recovery from it. This session will:

  • Review recent updates in the understanding of pressure injury pathophysiology
  • Link assessment strategies, risk evaluation tools, and equipment choices to clinical action plans
  • Introduce data on the benefits of prophylactic dressings

1:15PM LUNCH AND NETWORKING


2:15

Gary Bain

When Wounds Won’t Heal – What’s Next?

The healing of wounds in older people can be problematic. What if a wound won’t heal? This session guides you through the principles of managing a non-healing wound. Topics include:

  • What are key principles for wound healing?
  • How does ageing affect healing?
  • Is wound healing always a goal in the adult aged 85+?
  • How can healing be optimised for older adults?
  • If healing can’t be achieved, how can a person’s quality of life and comfort be optimised?

3:00 AFTERNOON TEA


3:30

Marea Reading

Oxygen Therapy in the Older Adult – Is It Always Necessary?

Oxygen therapy represents an area where evidence has changed and clinical nursing practices must reflect this. No longer is oxygen always considered necessary and always considered safe. This session will bring you up to date on modern evidence about oxygen therapy, including how oxygen therapy and various devices can be safely and correctly chosen. It includes:

  • Why do we give oxygen?
  • How has evidence relating to safe oxygen therapy changed?
  • What do oxygen saturations really measure?
  • In the older adult, what targets of oxygen concentration should we be aiming for?
  • How do we choose the correct oxygen delivery device?

4:30 CLOSE OF DAY ONE OF CONFERENCE


Day Two

9:00AM COMMENCEMENT OF DAY TWO


9:00

Gwen Higgins

Medicine Used in the Very Old – What You Must Know To Be Safe

As people age their ability to metabolise medicines becomes challenged. In this session you will look at why this is the case. You will refresh your knowledge of the key changes and the clinical implications of this. It includes a refresher on:

  • The ageing kidney and liver and the effect on medicines
  • The safest medication delivery mechanisms – tablets, immediate release, sustained release, patches, MDIs, turbuhalers, or nebulisers
  • The dangers of crushing medicines
  • Concerns with over-the-counter medicines (such as Ibuprofen)
  • The top 20 drug interactions you must be aware of

10:00

Mike Smith

Mental Health and Cognitive Changes in Older Adults

As we get older, the likelihood of undergoing alterations to brain function is high. This may include normal neurodegenerative changes as well as abnormal deteriorations. Separating normal from dysfunctional degeneration when screening and assessing an older adult is essential for quality nursing care planning. In this session, we will look at:

  • What are the normal age-related changes to the brain and consequent behavioural signs?
  • How are these changes different to the onset of mental health disorders such as schizophrenia, psychosis, or bipolar disorder?
  • What are age-appropriate assessment tools for effective mental health assessment?
  • What are the benefits of brief psychosocial interventions?
  • What practical behavioural strategies may improve outcomes for a person with a mental health disorder and cognitive changes?

10:45 MORNING TEA


11:15

Jane O’Brien

Fractures and Osteoporosis – Prevention and Management

Every day, many Australians living with osteoporosis sustain a hip fracture. The outcomes for people following surgery vary, however for a small group this triggers a cascade of consequences that significantly impact on quality of life. This session will focus on the prevention and management of low trauma fractures of the hip, shoulder, and spine. It includes an update on evidence-based treatment for osteoporosis and looks at:

  • What is the prevalence of osteoporosis and associated fractures?
  • What are the best approaches to fracture prevention?
  • What are the management and intervention options for the osteoporotic fracture?

12:15

Jane O’Brien

Fractured Hips – NOF Injuries in Older Adults

Decreased bone density makes an older person at increased risk of hip fractures. Sometimes a person may not know they have sustained a fracture as, in some cases, it is possible to walk on a fractured hip. This session explains:

  • What makes NOF injuries some of the most common in adults aged 85+?
  • How should an older adult with a suspected fractured hip be assessed?
  • What makes an older adult more susceptible to complications?
  • What are the correct indications for joint replacement surgery in an older adult?
  • What is the recovery and long-term outlook for NOF injuries in older adults?

1:15PM LUNCH AND NETWORKING


2:15

Gary Bain

Preventing Hospital Readmission and Promoting Recovery

Older adults' lives and those of their families and carers can be overwhelmingly challenged by the consequences of injury, surgery, and illness that end in hospitalisation. As well, hospitals are increasingly being penalised if people are readmitted within certain time frames, such as 30 days. How can we promote recovery in the older adult and prevent unnecessary readmission through rehabilitation? This session considers:

  • How does avoiding hospitalisation improve quality of life?
  • What are key practices and models for nursing and interprofessional care that aim to prevent the revolving door of hospital readmissions?

3:00 AFTERNOON TEA


3:30

Julie Letts

Care and Decision Making at the End of Life

How people die matters. Ensuring that the dying person’s wishes are respected, and that quality, timely, and appropriate care is provided is an important responsibility of the health and aged care systems. This should be part of the quality agenda of all organisations caring for people at the end of life. This session will briefly address:

  • Big picture – why end-of-life care has proved so difficult to improve over decades
  • Advance care planning – trigger events and what we know works (and doesn’t)
  • Systems of care and the challenges in actually delivering what patients and their families want at end of life
  • Why some understanding of ethics and law around end-of-life decisions can help in practice
  • Where to find good resources

4:30 CLOSE OF CONFERENCE AND EVALUATIONS


The Goal Need for Program

How adults 85+ age will depend on individual strengths, their health, the ageing resources available, and the type of care they receive. Focusing only on problems and deficits, and negative perspectives of ageing, limits wellbeing and increases vulnerability towards functional decline, chronic illness, and other conditions. Nurses have already experienced the significant increase in the number of adults 85+ who require nursing care. As such, it is imperative that access to evidence-based, gerontological knowledge is available in order to provide age-appropriate and positive nursing care.

Purpose of Program

To provide nurses with knowledge that integrates a positive approach to ageing with the delivery of appropriate nursing care for adults aged 85+.

Your learning outcomes:

Incorporate a trauma-informed approach to the care you provide older adults

Formulate a nursing care plan that is based on current evidence that relates to the prevention of harm

Improve health and wellness outcomes by applying new and old knowledge across a range of physical and mental health conditions that are common to older adults

Collaborate with the health team members, and relevant family or carers to promote maximum functional independence and recovery, and to prevent hospital re-admission

Presenters

Gary Bain

Gary Bain

Gary is the Clinical Nurse Consultant (Wound Management) at the Mt Wilga Private Rehabilitation Hospital, Sydney. Concurrent with his clinical ... Read More

Marea Reading

Marea Reading

Marea Reading is a Registered Nurse with many years teaching experience in the speciality of cardiothoracic nursing. Marea held the ... Read More

Gwen Higgins

Gwen Higgins

Gwen Higgins is an Accredited Pharmacist undertaking home medicines reviews for general practitioners in the inner western suburbs of Sydney. ... Read More

Jane O'Brien

Jane O'Brien

Jane O'Brien is a clinical nurse specialist 2: orthopaedics at Lismore Base Hospital. Previously, Jane held the role as a ... Read More

Julie Letts

Julie Letts

Julie Letts is the director of LettsConsulting – a consulting service to the health and aged care sectors. She specializes ... Read More

Mike  Smith

Mike Smith

Mike Smith has been a mental health nurse for 20 years and has Master's degrees in Public Health and Mental ... Read More

Wendy Bryant

Wendy Bryant

Wendy Bryant is a Credentialled Diabetes Educator with 22 years' experience of specialised diabetes knowledge and skills in the provision ... Read More

To Be Determined

To Be Determined

Title
Nursing Adults Aged 85+ Conference
Speciality Classification
Interest Areas
-- GENERAL --
Location
Type
Delivery
Provider Type
RTO
Duration
11 hours
Start Date
30-Apr-2018
End Date
01-May-2018
CPD
11 hours
Price Details
$590.00 (two days)
Location
Surry Hills NSW 2010
Venue
Surry Hills Rydges Sydney Central, 28 Albion Street
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