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Nursing Adults Aged 85 +

  • : Surry Hills NSW 2010
Overview

 

Increasing numbers of people are living beyond 85 years of age and this particular population are set to grow substantially over the next few decades. This will have profound implications on the way you, as a nurse, provide care.

Are you and your service ready for an even larger older population? Are your gerontological nursing skills up-to-date? Attend this Conference and learn:

  • Age appropriate nursing assessment – why is it important?
  • Is cardiac disease age related and/or treatable in older adults?
  • Fading away – the problem of anaemia
  • How to manage chronic wounds correctly
  • Brain changes – identify the differences between normal and abnormal
  • Managing eye health… and much more
Schedule

 

Day One

8:30AM REGISTRATION FOR DAY ONE


9:00

Sharon Wall

Octogenarians and Nonagenarians: A Growing Force

According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) the number of people in the 65+ age group has tripled in size in fifty years. Significantly, those aged 85+ made up 13.5% of this group and is expected to be nearly 20% by 2064. Additionally, social and health trends are challenging the conventional concept of “old”. This opening session discusses the future for 85+ Australians. Includes:

  • Are we ready for an even larger older population?
  • Is a one-size-fits-all approach to health care for older adults adequate?
  • What constitutes quality care for this group of citizens?
  • What is “active” ageing?
  • How should “old” be redefined?

9:45

Sharon Wall

Getting to Know Mr and Mrs Costa

Mr and Mrs Costa have been together 66 years and are still in the home they bought when they were married. Mrs Costa says she is physically well apart from a high cholesterol, a bit of deafness and constipation. Mr Costa says he is okay but knocked his leg recently, exhibits breathlessness and is sight impaired. In this session, health and social matters, and potential risks, for this couple will be explored using a comprehensive nursing assessment framework. It includes:

  • What special considerations should be taken into account when assessing Mr and Mrs Costa?
  • What is an age appropriate assessment?
  • Commonly missed clues in the assessment of older adults and why they are missed
  • What key conclusions can be identified from the data?

10:30 MORNING TEA


11:00

Ross Proctor

Cardiac Disease: Is it the Ageing Process or a Treatable Disease?

Under-diagnosis of important cardiac disease is a common problem for older adults. For those people aged 85+ this can be a particular problem. However, early detection can help to reduce morbidity and subsequent hospitalisation. This session looks at the cardiac assessment of very old adults and includes:

  • Why is cardiac disease often undetected in very old people?
  • Tips on performing a cardiac assessment in this age group
  • When is ECG indicated and why?
  • What type of cardiac treatments can improve life in this group?
  • What risks are associated with under-diagnosis of this disease?

11:45

TBA

Fading Away? The Danger of Anaemia in Older Adults

One or more long-term health conditions are prevalent in older adults and although it may be overlooked, anaemia is a common problem in this group. Its onset is often insidious and low haemoglobin usually indicates physical decline. Reduced quality of life results as does the risk of morbidity and mortality. In this session we will look at:

  • What are the common aetiologies of anaemia in very old adults?
  • What risks and consequences are associated with anaemia in this group?
  • Looking for the signs – comprehensive nursing assessment
  • Improving quality of life - principles of treatment and education

12:30PM LUNCH BREAK


1:30

Debbie Blanchfield

Skin Integrity in Older Adults

With changes to healthy skin structure and function in older adults, there is high risk of damage to skin integrity. Tears and abrasions can lead to serious problems and infection can readily emerge in exposed areas. This session will examine key concepts to guide your comprehensive nursing assessment of skin in older adults. Includes:

  • Physiological skin changes over time
  • Factors that affect the rate of deterioration and problems that arise
  • Skin conditions that develop e.g. pruritus
  • Risks to skin integrity from prolonged immobility

2:15

Debbie Blanchfield

The Chronic Wound: A Nursing Challenge

This session looks at the difficulties faced by older people once their skin has broken down and a chronic wound is established. It will discuss ways to manage the care of a person’s wound in difficult healing circumstances. If systemic disease is also present, wounds can rapidly develop from seemingly insignificant behaviours such as prolonged sitting. Topics include:

  • What causes a wound to be detained in one of the phases of healing?
  • What is the correct nursing care of such a wound?
  • How to avoid skin breakdown, including assessment for pressure injury

3:00 AFTERNOON TEA


3:30

Janette Williams

Constipation: Whose Problem is It?

Would you rather be sitting on the toilet or left lying in bed to defaecate? Constipation is not a side effect of the ageing process but is experienced by older people. Often underdiagnosed it causes severe discomfort. It can also become a serious problem when attention is not paid to the pillars of prevention and correct management. This session looks at:

  • Changes to bowel function and motility in older people
  • Assessing for risk or presence of constipation in an older person
  • What are the complications of constipation which increase morbidity and poor quality of life?
  • The pillars of preventing and managing constipation

4:30 CLOSE OF DAY ONE OF PROGRAM


Day Two

9:00AM COMMENCEMENT OF DAY TWO


9:00

Dr Jim Kokkinakis

Looking and Seeing: Eye Health

Diseases of the eye and sight impairment in older adults is not uncommon and may result in poor functional and social health, falls, admission to an aged care facility and increased mortality. As the age of a person increases, the higher the risk of visual impairment and studies have shown a significant increase between the ages of 70 and 90. This session overviews some of the more prevalent disorders and how older adults with visual impairment can be assisted. Includes:

  • Is vision deterioration inevitable in older adults?
  • Common age related eye diseases and conditions e.g. macular degeneration, cataracts, refractive error, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy
  • Health related decision making in relation to treatment
  • When nothing can be done, what resources are available?

9:45

Dr Catherine McMahon

What Was That Nurse? Hearing Loss

Among older adults, hearing loss is one of the most common self-reported conditions. More common in men than women, over half of men aged 75+ experience full or partial deafness. However, not all older adults may not be aware of their hearing loss or may not admit to a problem. This session will consider hearing loss, its consequences and management for older adults. Includes:

  • Which older adults are at most risk of hearing loss?
  • What are the most common causes of hearing loss and everyday consequences?
  • Audiometric testing – is it always necessary?

10:30 MORNING TEA


11:00

Anne Hoolahan

The Complexity of Dementia: One Size Does Not Fit All

Dementia is an incurable condition that affects around 30% of people over the age of 85. It is the second leading cause of death of Australian adults and even when medically diagnosed, this condition attracts stigmatisation and is considered hopeless. A superior understanding of the underlying pathophysiology contributes to quality care for people with the condition as well as their family or carers. This session will provide an update on the pathophysiology of dementia and includes:

  • An overview of the main types of dementia and their pathophysiology
  • The differentiating presentation of the main types of dementia?
  • What are the screening and assessment processes required for a dementia diagnosis?
  • How are delirium and depression mistaken for dementia?

12:00

TBA

Depression and Schizophrenia in Adults Aged 85+

As we get older, the likelihood of undergoing alterations to brain function is high. This may include normal neurodegenerative changes as well as abnormal deteriorations. Separating normal from dysfunctional degeneration when screening and assessing an older adult is essential for quality nursing care planning. This session will look at:

  • Changes to the brain and consequent behavioural signs
  • Age appropriate assessment tools for effective mental health assessment
  • Matching assessment to care to avert risk:
    • Case scenario 1 – depressive illness
    • Case scenario 2 – older onset schizophrenia

12:45PM LUNCH BREAK


1:45

Sue Driscoll

Chronic Pain Management in a Polypharmacy Context

Chronic pain is a common condition for older adults. It is linked to reduced mobility, falls, activity avoidance, isolation and sleep problems. It has potential to disturb family and social relationships. The management of pain may be multimodal involving analgesic medicines. However, older adults experience pharmacokinetic and metabolic changes and may also be prescribed a range of medicines for other conditions. This session will look at:

  • What pharmacokinetic and metabolic changes are commonly associated with older adults?
  • How do these make older adults vulnerable to side effects with analgesics?
  • What common medicines and analgesics are contra-indicated?
  • What important nursing assessment data is essential in decision-making about the correct medicine for pain control?

2:45 AFTERNOON TEA


3:15

Sharon Wall

The Follow Up - Mr and Mrs Costa

Assisting older adults to age well requires best practice nursing care and proactive management of limited resources. It also depends on the older person’s abilities to self-manage their lives, aging processes, and chronic diseases. This interactive final session brings together the knowledge gained from previous sessions and critically examines issues in consideration of the quality of life for Mr and Mrs Costa. It includes:

  • Which tools best assist age related nursing assessment?
  • How does appropriate assessment relate to appropriate nursing decision-making, care planning and referral?
  • What are the main barriers to self-management abilities and how can these be addressed?
  • Tips for coordinating evidence based nursing care when attitudes are against you

4:15 CLOSE OF DAY TWO OF PROGRAM


The Goal Need for Program

Increasing numbers of people are living beyond 85 years and this group is estimated to grow substantially over the next decades. How they age will depend on individual strengths, their health, the ageing resources available, and the type of care they receive. Focusing only on problems and deficits, and negative perspectives of ageing, limits wellbeing and increases vulnerability towards functional decline, chronic illness, and other conditions. Nurses have already experienced the significant increase in the level of adults 85+ who require nursing care. As such, it is imperative that access to evidence-based, gerontological knowledge is available in order to provide age appropriate positive nursing care.

Purpose of Program

To provide nurses with knowledge that integrates a positive approach to ageing with the delivery of appropriate nursing care for adults aged 85+.

Your learning outcomes:

Use a positive approach to ageing framework to nurse older adults that reduces their vulnerability towards health decline and dependence.

Formulate nursing care plans that are based on a comprehensive age appropriate assessment which includes physical abilities, cognitive function, and social support

Improve health wellness outcomes by applying new and old knowledge of a range of physical and mental health conditions and their treatments which are common to older adults

Collaborate with the health team members, and relevant family or carers to promote maximum functional independence and wellbeing

Presenters

To Be Determined

To Be Determined

 

Sharon Wall

Sharon Wall

Sharon Wall is currently the director of Ageing by Caring Pty Ltd and has qualifications that include a Diploma of ... Read More

Ross Proctor

Ross Proctor

Ross Proctor is currently employed as the Clinical Nurse Consultant for Cardiology at the Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney. Ross ...Read More

Debbie Blanchfield

Debbie Blanchfield

Debbie Blanchfield is currently Clinical Nurse Consultant in Wound Care for Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District. Debbie is a Registered ... Read More

Janette Williams

Janette Williams

Janette Williams is a Continence Consultant with an impressive background in the care of patients with urinary/bowel dysfunctions. Her clinical ... Read More

Jim Kokkinakis

Jim Kokkinakis

Dr Jim Kokkinakis has been providing eye care for more than 30 years. He completed his optometry degree at the University ... Read More

Catherine McMahon

Catherine McMahon

Dr Catherine McMahon is a researcher, clinical audiologist and the Head of Audiology at Macquarie University. Catherine is a senior ...Read More

Anne Hoolahan

Anne Hoolahan

Anne Hoolahan has a Graduate Diploma in Applied Science (Nursing), a Graduate Diploma in Health Science (Gerontology) and a Master ... Read More

Sue Driscoll

Sue Driscoll

Sue Driscoll is a Consultant Pharmacist working in the aged care sector. She has worked in large acute hospitals, visited ... Read More

Title
Nursing Adults Aged 85 +
Speciality Classification
Location
Type
Delivery
Provider Type
RTO
Duration
11 hours 15 mins
Start Date
01-Nov-2016
End Date
02-Nov-2016
CPD
11 hours 15 mins
Fees
$561.00 (two days)
Location
Surry Hills NSW 2010
Venue
Rydges Sydney Central (formerly Sebel Surry Hills), 28 Albion Street
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