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Preventing Surgical Complications Conference

  • : West Lakes SA 5021
Overview

 

Attend this event to ensure you are well-informed about how to prevent a raft of potential surgical complications from occurring. Understand why things go wrong, how to recognise and respond to warning signs early, and how to prevent the need for a patient to return to theatre. Learn about:

  • Fluid and electrolyte changes – why they must not be overlooked
  • Managing acute delirium
  • Causes of cardiac, respiratory, and renal complications
  • How to assess for signs of acute stroke
  • Diabetes management before and after surgery
  • Preventing healthcare-associated infections and much, much more...
Schedule Day One

8:30 REGISTRATION FOR DAY ONE


9:00

Welcome and Introduction

9:05

Paul McLeish

The Surgical Journey – Where Things go Wrong

The patient undergoing a surgical procedure moves through many different areas and is exposed to the care of many various teams before, during, and after surgery. Minimising the risk of complications that this person may experience and enhancing positive health outcomes starts with an understanding of:

  • How do we prepare patients for surgery?
  • What are we really ticking on a surgical checklist?
  • What happens after a nurse hands a patient over in the anaesthetic holding bay?
  • What can go wrong in the operating room and why this should matter to you?
  • How do delays create a cascade of effects for others?
  • What are the common complications that cause patients to return to surgery?
  • How can you potentially prevent some of these complications?

10:00

Jayne Lehmann

Managing Diabetes Pre- and Post-Operatively

Surgical intervention for a person with diabetes can disrupt their glycaemic management. For instance, fasting and the metabolic impacts of surgery can affect glucose levels, contributing to an increased morbidity and possible increased length of stay. This session will look at the management of diabetes pre-operatively and post-operatively. It includes:

  • What needs to be considered when a person with diabetes is having surgery?
  • What are the possible risks for people with diabetes having surgery?
  • What do you need to consider post-operatively?
  • How do you assess, and what do you need to consider when preparing a person for discharge when they have diabetes?

10:45 MORNING TEA


11:15

Peter Hayball

Post-Operative Medication Interactions

Medication complications can occur at any time. In a post-operative environment, the common use of high-risk medications can increase these risks immensely. This session will look into these interactions and the potential danger of common medications groups that are administered in a post-operative setting. These include:

  • Anti-infectives
  • Potassium and other electrolytes
  • Narcotics and other sedatives
  • Heparin and other anticoagulants

12:15

Lesley Thomas

VTE Risk Assessment and Reduction – An Orthopaedic Perspective

All surgical procedures represent a high risk of VTE. Orthopaedic patients are among the most vulnerable due to a range of factors, including functional restrictions and prothrombotic processes related to injury. The risk of VTE for orthopaedic patients begins at injury and extends well beyond hospitalisation. The surgeon must balance effective VTE prophylaxis with bleeding risk in this high-risk patient group. This session will discuss:

  • Risk identification and risk reduction strategies from pre-admission to discharge for patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery
  • Recommendations for extended mechanical and chemical prophylaxis in orthopaedic patients
  • The challenges in providing effective VTE prophylaxis in elective orthopaedic surgery and complex trauma

1:00 LUNCH AND NETWORKING


2:00

Tracy Edwards

Post-Operative Respiratory and Cardiac Complications

How confident are you in your ability to recognise and respond to the early signs that a patient may be deteriorating following surgery? How can you ensure that you have the knowledge and ability to take the necessary action and prevent post-operative complications? This session will identify common complications following surgery with a focus on cardiac and respiratory disorders in surgical patients. Topics include:

  • Clinical manifestations, investigations, and appropriate nursing actions of:
    • Atelectasis
    • Acute pulmonary oedema
    • Atrial fibrillation
    • Hypovolaemic shock and haemorrhage

3:00 AFTERNOON TEA


3:30

Genevieve Brideson

The Ins and Outs of Fluid and Electrolyte Changes

Patients are prone to fluid loss during surgery, whether it be blood or different bodily fluids. This often impacts fluid and electrolyte balance. In patients with chronic comorbidities, imbalances can result in unnecessary adverse events. This session will explain why fluid imbalance occurs post-operatively and when it is necessary for additional fluid therapies or electrolyte replacement to occur. Topics include:

  • How is fluid and electrolytes managed post-operatively?
  • What are the indications that a patient may have a fluid and electrolyte imbalance?
  • When is it time for additional fluid therapy?
  • What are the consequences of prolonged fluid and electrolyte imbalance?
  • How do you detect acute kidney injury?

4:30 CLOSE OF DAY ONE OF CONFERENCE


Day Two

9:00 COMMENCEMENT OF DAY TWO


9:00

Lizzie Dodd

Assessing for Post-Operative Stroke – Don’t Miss it!

The risk of a post-operative stroke in a low-risk non-vascular surgery is uncommon. However, if it occurs it can severely impact the recovery from surgery and have debilitating functional outcomes. This session will look at the unlikely, but possible, event of a post-operative stroke, as well as the life-changing consequences that occur and how to assess for it. It includes:

  • Why do post-operative strokes occur?
  • Who is more at risk of experiencing a post-operative stroke?
  • How would you recognise it?
  • How can you implement strategies to assess for post-operative stroke?

10:00

Matt Kowald

A Practical Guide to Managing – Acute Delirium and Post-Operative Confusion

An acute change in mental status often is a gateway to hospital-acquired delirium. Preventing hospital-acquired delirium can reduce the length of stay, reduce the risk of adverse events, such as falls, and improve the overall hospital experience for a person. This session will look further into hospital-acquired delirium in a post-operative environment. It includes:

  • Can the risk of hospital-acquired delirium increase in a post-operative environment?
  • Acute delirium and post-operative confusion – how are they different?
  • How can you prevent further injury in a patient with post-op confusion or acute delirium?

10:45 MORNING TEA


11:15

Norah Bostock

When Hospital Equals Harm – Preventing Persistent Incontinence

Persistent incontinence is hugely debilitating. It has significant ramifications for a person’s emotional, social, and physical health. It is highly stigmatising and can lead to a raft of unpleasant symptoms, such as painful skin breakdown. It’s also tremendously costly to a healthcare service. It extends hospital stays yet is a preventable healthcare-associated complication. This session shines a light on:

  • Who is most vulnerable?
  • What factors are associated with persistent incontinence?
  • How can it be prevented?
  • How can we assess for persistent incontinence?
  • What does a prevention plan look like?
  • How can it be effectively monitored and reduced?

12:00

Genevieve Brideson

Surviving Sepsis – The Importance of Early Recognition

Sepsis is a potentially fatal condition caused by a whole-of-body inflammatory response to severe infection. Preventing the mortality related to sepsis begins with early detection and timely interventions. This session uses case scenarios to explain the pathophysiological mechanisms by which sepsis develops. It will look at how you can detect the early warning signs of sepsis. Finally, it will assist you to understand the evidence-based management of this potentially fatal condition. It includes:

  • What are the new definitions of sepsis?
  • Early recognition – what are the clinical signs of sepsis in adults?
  • What is the increased risk of sepsis in a surgical environment?

12:45 LUNCH AND NETWORKING


1:45

Margi Moncrieff

Not Always Clear Cut – Preventing Surgical-Site Infections

There are risks to any type of surgery and surgical-site infections are one of them. They are a costly yet preventable healthcare-associated infection. This session looks at surgical-site infections and how they can be prevented. We will consider:

  • Who is more inclined to develop an SSIs?
  • What type of strategies could be used to decrease the risk of SSIs?
  • What are alternative ways to promote wound healing after surgery? i.e nutrition

2:45

TBA

The ABCs of Preventing CLABSIs

Central venous access devices need to be carefully assessed, managed, and monitored if we are to reduce the risk of complications, such as infection and thrombosis, as well as to promote device longevity. This session reviews the key considerations for the management of venous access devices, including key tips for troubleshooting when things go wrong. It includes:

  • How are the devices selected?
  • What are common complications during and following insertion?
  • How do good assessment, maintenance, and monitoring prevent thrombosis and CLABSIs?
  • What is the latest evidence for managing safe blood sampling, flushing, medication/fluid administration, and dressing and line changes?
  • What are the common troubleshooting tips when an occlusion occurs?

3:30 AFTERNOON TEA


4:00

Genevieve Brideson

When Deterioration Strikes – Great Teams Rise to the Challenge

This final session will look at a low fidelity, high occurrence situation to get you working together. It includes a group exercise to build on your communication and collaboration across the surgical journey to support the provision of comprehensive care. It includes:

  • How do you delegate tasks during an adverse event?
  • How do you promote teamwork and why is it so useful?
  • Why is communication key?

4:30 CLOSE OF CONFERENCE AND EVALUATIONS


The Goal Need for Program

There are inherent risks associated with any surgical procedure. Preventing costly surgical complications, such as an unplanned return to theatre or an escalation of care to critical care environments, is a key priority after any procedure. The provision of care that is underpinned by best practice is known to reduce the likelihood of hospital-acquired complications. There is a timely need for nurses to gain key updates on how to detect and respond early to potential surgical complications if patient harm is to be minimised.

Purpose of Program

The purpose of this conference is to provide key updates on how to detect and manage potential surgical complications so as to reduce patient harm and improve patient safety.

Your learning outcomes:

Be better able to recognise high-risk individuals before harm occurs

Utilise sharpened assessment skills to assist in responding to signs of clinical deterioration more rapidly

Reduce the pain and discomfort experienced by patients as a result of an unplanned return to theatre

Utilise communication and collaboration across the surgical journey to support the provision of comprehensive care

Presenters

To Be Determined

To Be Determined

 

Genevieve Brideson

Genevieve Brideson

Genevieve Brideson completed her general nurse training in 1985, operating room certificate in 1988, midwifery in 1992, and a bachelor ...Read More

Jayne Lehmann

Jayne Lehmann

Jayne Lehmann is a popular presenter who draws on 32 years of working with people with diabetes. Multi-skilled as an ... Read More

Tracy Edwards

Tracy Edwards

Tracy is a Nurse Practitioner working in the emergency department at Modbury Public Hospital in South Australia. In this role, ...Read More

Matt Kowald

Matt Kowald

Matt Kowald is a Registered Nurse with 20 years’ experience and a passion for aged care, which he has demonstrated ... Read More

Norah Bostock

Norah Bostock

Norah Bostock is a highly qualified clinician and educator working in private practice in South Australia. Norah draws her considerable ... Read More

Margi Moncrieff

Margi Moncrieff

Margi Moncrieff has been working at Flinders Medical Centre in the area of chronic and acute wound management for 30 ... Read More

Lesley Thomas

Lesley Thomas

Lesley Thomas is an orthopaedic Nurse Practitioner at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, South Australia. This role facilitates the journey for ... Read More

Paul McLiesh

Paul McLiesh

Paul McLiesh has worked as an orthopaedic nurse for 23 years at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. He is now a ... Read More

Peter Hayball

Peter Hayball

Dr Peter Hayball is the principal pharmacist for the South Australian Ambulance Service where his chief role is to assist ... Read More

Lizzie Dodd

Lizzie Dodd

Lizzie Dodd is a Nurse Consultant in the Acute Stroke unit at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. ...Read More

Type
Delivery
Title
Preventing Surgical Complications Conference
Speciality Classification
Interest Areas / Topics Covered
-- GENERAL MEDICAL--
Location
Provider Type
RTO
Duration
11 Hours | 00 Mins
Start Date
14-Mar-2019
End Date
15-Mar-2019
CPD Points
11 Hours | 00 Mins
Price
610.00
Location
West Lakes SA 5021
Venue
West Lakes The Lakes Resort Hotel Adelaide, 141 Brebner Drive
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