This post has expired! It was posted more than 90 days ago.
<- Back

Sydney Nurses' Conference

  • : Surry Hills NSW 2010
Overview

 

Every year Ausmed Education holds a Nurses’ Conference specifically designed for your location aimed at assisting you to rapidly get up-to-date on current nursing topics. Attend this local Nurses’ Conference to close gaps in your knowledge and skills. Find out:

  • What are some of the health priorities that you need to know about?
  • Why is the focus away from the throughput of healthcare and towards the quality of the outcome?
  • What nursing interventions make a difference especially to those with chronic conditions?
  • Why is evidence so important to the way you practice?
  • The latest information about a range of current treatments
Schedule

 Print Schedule

Day One

8:30AM REGISTRATION FOR DAY ONE


9:05

Denise Hayden

TBA

9:45

Wendy Bryant

Diabetes - What’s Changed?

Over the past five years the way in which people with diabetes are managed has changed dramatically. The aim of this presentation is to:

  • Review different types of oral medications
  • Review insulin – types and actions
  • Introduce the new injectables
  • Continuous glucose monitoring systems
  • Summarise the new international insulin injection guidelines

10:45 MORNING TEA AND COFFEE


11:15

Gwen Higgins

Who is Influencing Me - Discretely or Directly?

Increasingly, representatives from the pharmaceutical and associated industries are targeting nurses. This may be in the form of information, participation in user familiarisation programs for particular products or helping patients sign up for company or self-help newsletters, e.g. bone health medicines. How can a balance be achieved between receiving information from industry sources and ensuring our clinical decisions are based on current best practice evidence? This session will look at sifting evidence from hype. Case scenarios will be used to highlight how clinical decision making can be quarantined from marketing influence to ensure the best patient outcomes. Includes:

  • A review of potential conflicts of interest
  • How to assess for bias in the information provided
  • What questions should nurses be asking about medicines?
  • How can nurses ensure that clinical decisions are in each patient’s best interest?

12:15

Terry Froggatt

Mindful contemplation for nurses

According to Jon Kabat-Zinn, 'mindfulness' means paying attention in a particular way, on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally.

  • Mindful nurses learn how to pay attention on purpose by practising specially developed mindfulness meditation practices and mindful movements
  • What is the neuroscience that validates mindfulness?
  • The effects of mindfulness meditation on attention, emotional regulation and self-awareness

1:15PM LUNCH AND NETWORKING


2:00

Dr Vivien Lane

The Future(s) of Nursing Care

Computers are rapidly becoming integrated into bedside nursing care, and in the next few years our activities as nurses will be revolutionised. Gradually the idea of doing 'computer work’ as different or separate to ‘patient care’ will become old hat and our vocabulary will include new terms such as ‘algorythmic management’. Will nurses be wearing ear pieces and microphones, working to a preset format and taking instructions from an e-team leader the nurse never meets? This session will consider:

  • Overview of the amazing technologies coming to nursing
  • How nursing care will change
  • What will become of the value of ‘TLC’ nursing care within a technologically-rich work place?

2:45

Associate Professor Tim Wand

Safety When Dealing With Intoxicated People

The use of alcohol and other drugs such as crystal methamphetamine or ice may induce or increase aggression. Intoxicated people may behave irrationally and could be a danger to themselves and others. All health professionals must be alert to the risks associated with these potential harms. This session discusses and demonstrates practical de-escalation techniques to defuse violent behaviour in people that are escalated as a result of intoxication. Includes:

  • What are the physical cues that suggest someone may be intoxicated?
  • How do you protect:
    • The person?
    • The public?
    • Yourself?
  • How to de-escalate and defuse the situation
  • Body language and personal safety to stay safe and reduce need for chemical and physical restraints

3:30 AFTERNOON TEA AND COFFEE


3:45

Sue Mason

Hepatitis C - The Treatment Revolution

Recently we have observed huge leaps forward in the treatment of Hepatitis C. A new generation of medicines have resulted in many Australians now having access to more effective treatment with fewer side effects. This session will bring you up to speed on what this means and includes:

  • A quick look at Hepatitis C - transmission and course of disease
  • Overview of treatment options
  • What these changes mean for nurses and other health professionals

4:30 CLOSE OF DAY ONE OF PROGRAM


Day Two

9:00AM COMMENCEMENT OF DAY TWO


9:00

Annie Hepworth

Caring for Patients with Delirium and Dementia in Acute Care

Managing an increasing number of patients who are admitted to the hospital through the emergency department with cognitive impairment is both an operational and clinical challenge. We know that patients with cognitive impairment are less likely to return to baseline functional and cognitive levels after an admission. What role does the hospital environment play in this?

  • Patients with cognitive impairment have specific needs during a hospital admission
  • Relationships with family/carers is vital
  • Discharge and ongoing care co-ordination vital after discharge

9:45

Samantha Faithfull

Debriefing After Critical Incidents

Nurses working in any setting may be involved in a stressful or unexpectedly traumatic event whilst at work. This may not be easy to deal with and may require critical incidence stress debriefing. This session will discuss what such a debrief entails and when it is effective. As well, these principles of debriefing after a crisis can be adapted to everyday small stresses to prevent them from building up into big ones! Includes:

  • How to prevent the critical incident causing undue stress
  • When to know that you may need some debriefing support
  • An opportunity to constructively de-brief as a group

10:45 MORNING TEA AND COFFEE


11:15

Sue Querruel

From Classroom to Critical Care - A Look at Direct Entry Specialisation

From hospital to university training, the pathway to developing the nursing workforce has changed continually over the past few decades. A further evolution to this is an emerging trend seeing direct entry specialisation being encouraged. Aimed at addressing a shortage of specialist nurses and the ageing workforce, early introduction into speciality nursing areas is now prompting university graduates to specialise. What does the current nursing workforce think of this move and is it being embraced? This session aims to open up the conversation and discuss:

  • What is direct-entry specialisation and who is following this pathway?
  • Why are advanced practice nursing principles being introduced during undergraduate years?
  • What issues can arise from this?
  • Are current experiences positive or negative?
  • How is the current nursing workforce in speciality areas responding to this?

12:15

Dr Vivien Lane

’Patient-driven Death’ - Nursing Reflections

Administering medications for pain relief is a commonly known and guaranteed key intervention offered to patients admitted for palliative care. Whilst euthanasia is attracting debate worldwide, the notion of a health professional giving a patient ‘the final big cocktail’ to induce death remains illegal in Australia. However, some patients are demanding to expedite their gradual death over a few days or weeks rather than ‘linger’ over many months. Scenarios from real-life clinical experience will demonstrate how having ‘insider’ knowledge of palliative care enables some patients to control their own death process. The boundaries of these ‘pro-death’ practices will be explored from the perspective of preserving nursing integrity and within nurses’ scope of practice.

  • Revision of palliative care principles and nurse-initiated and administered medications
  • Characteristics of a ‘patient-driven expedited death’
  • Scenarios form clinical practice
  • Lessons for nurses engaged with the ‘pro-death’ patient/family

1:15PM LUNCH AND NETWORKING


2:00

Debbie Blanchfield

Managing Pain Associated with Wound Management

Many nurses may have been in a situation where a patient has become anxious before, during or after a dressing is attended. Pain experienced in the dressing procedure will lead to patient apprehension, increase the time taken, inhibit wound healing and, in many cases, increase staff stress. This session refers to two case studies to consider:

  • Procedural pain in paediatric patients
  • Procedural pain in adults

3:00 AFTERNOON TEA AND COFFEE


3:30

Michael Nancarrow

From Ethical Storytelling to a Narrative of Ethical Woundedness: The Quest for Professional Identity in the Age of Technology

From individual stories of ethical experience, dealing with ethical dilemmas and conflicts (both for ourselves and those we work with, report to or are supervised by) and finding a way forward with strategies and responses rather than ‘crystal ball’ answers, we discover a larger narrative which binds us to each other in our professional and ethical journeys as we search to secure our identity in the rapidly changing landscape of nursing practice in the 21st Century. This session will explore the following themes:

  • The role of ethical story telling in professional decision-making
  • Exploring the meaning of truth in nursing decisions
  • Reconsidering professional competence in light of technology
  • Learning to construct a narrative of ethical woundedness with a spirit of hope.

4:00 CLOSE OF DAY TWO OF PROGRAM


The Goal Need for Program

 

Safety and quality are essential and are directly linked to knowledge. The need for you to continually seek new information in regard to the nursing care you provide is a given, no matter where you work. This is a time when:

  • Healthcare budgets are under increased stress
  • The community purse is shrinking
  • Throughput is no longer the goal of care and is being replaced with quality outcomes

It is more important than ever that you take a leadership role in providing high value care to people that is outcome focused. Addressing emerging gaps in knowledge through up-to-date information is crucial if safe, quality outcomes are to be achieved.

Purpose of Program

This program provides you with current knowledge relating to a range of professional and practice topics that will improve how you deliver nursing care.

Your learning outcomes:

People in your care with health risks will receive preventative nursing action to avoid illness

Better patient outcomes will be achieved through the application of up-to-date knowledge relating to specific nursing interventions

Inter-professional collaboration will be optimised to enhance patient outcomes

Patient outcomes will be underpinned by evidence-based practice and recognised standards and guidelines

Presenters

Wendy Bryant

Wendy Bryant

Wendy Bryant is a Credentialled Diabetes Educator with 22 years' experience of specialised diabetes knowledge and skills in the provision ... Read More

Vivien Lane

Vivien Lane

Dr Vivien Lane is a nurse clinician specialising in oncology and palliative care, with over three decades’ experience in education, ... Read More

Tim Wand

Tim Wand

Tim Wand is an associate professor in mental health nursing with the University of Sydney and the Sydney Local Health ... Read More

Terry Froggatt

Terry Froggatt

Terry Froggatt is committed to evidenced-based organisational learning and development. Providing innovative and learner focused seminars and programs which facilitate ... Read More

Suzanne Querruel

Suzanne Querruel

Suzi Querruel has been working in the perioperative field for the past decade. Her passion lies in perianaesthesia nursing and ... Read More

Sue Mason

Sue Mason

Sue Mason has been a registered nurse since 1989, working in the fields of gastroenterology surgery, and gastroenterology and hepatology. ... Read More

Samantha Faithfull

Samantha Faithfull

Samantha Faithfull is Nurse Unit Manager Cardiothoracic /Cardiopulmonary Intensive Care Unit at St Vincent's Hospital Sydney. Samantha is also President ... Read More

Michael Nancarrow

Michael Nancarrow

Michael Nancarrow has studied economics, law and political theory at Macquarie University, the University of Sydney and at the University ... Read More

Gwen Higgins

Gwen Higgins

Gwen Higgins is an accredited pharmacist undertaking home medicines reviews for general practitioners in the inner western suburbs of Sydney. ... Read More

Denise Hayden

Denise Hayden

Denise Hayden is a health professional based in New South Wales. ... Read More

Debbie Blanchfield

Debbie Blanchfield

Debbie Blanchfield is currently Clinical Nurse Consultant in Wound Care for Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District. Debbie is a Registered ... Read More

Annie Hepworth

Annie Hepworth

Annie Hepworth is a clinical nurse consultant based in Sydney. ... Read More

Title
Sydney Nurses' Conference
Speciality Classification
Location
Type
Delivery
Provider Type
RTO
Duration
11 hours 45 mins
Start Date
29-May-2017
End Date
30-May-2017
CPD
11 hours 45 mins
Fees
$572.00 (two days)
Location
Surry Hills NSW 2010
Venue
Rydges Sydney Central (formerly Sebel Surry Hills), 28 Albion Street
Posted By
Location Map
Google Map
HealthcareLink