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Nursing Older Adults in Acute Care

  • : Brisbane QLD 4001

 

A Conference for Nurses

Overview

Most nursing care provided in acute hospitals is for people older than 65 years. There are many subtle and not-so-subtle differences in nursing younger adults versus these older adults which can significantly influence outcomes. This timely conference looks at some of these points of difference and examines how nurses make a difference when using a gerontic approach to acute care. Includes:

  • What are the major nursing factors affecting adults versus older people in acute care?
  • What are the big risks for older adults in acute care?
  • How does nursing care improve acute care outcomes?
  • What makes people bounce back to hospital?
  • How does acute nursing care embrace the special needs of the very old?

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Schedule

 Print Schedule

Day One

8:30AM REGISTRATION FOR DAY ONE


9:00

Tara Quirke

Putting the Ageing Process into Assessment

One of the most effective tools for appropriate nursing care is a comprehensive assessment. With hospital admissions for older adults rising rapidly, assessing for age-related changes is essential. However, assessment of the older adult is not just common sense and can be tricky. In this practical session using case scenarios we will explore:

  • What is a normal age-related change?
  • What are the physiological changes related to the ageing process that we can expect?
  • Why are common clues indicating an underlying problem often missed in the assessment of older adults?
  • What is an age-appropriate assessment?
  • When short of time, what should you not exclude in your assessment?

10:00

Dr Ruth Hubbard

Frailty in Older Adults - What Nurses Need to Know

The concept of frailty has been the focus of considerable research over the last 10 years. Yet while the definition of frailty is agreed (as a state of vulnerability associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes), many questions remain unanswered. This session will explore the following key issues:

  • Are there different ways to measure frailty? Have they been validated in the hospital setting?
  • How can frailty be conceptualised as the failure of a complex system?
  • Why do frail older people have falls or delirium?
  • What are essential practices for acute care nurses to reduce complications resulting from frailty caring for?

10:45 MORNING TEA


11:15

John Serginson

Diminishing Returns? Declining Lung Function and Acute Illness

Acute illness can trigger an array of psychological and physiological responses that have the potential to kill. This session includes looks at what happens when declining lung function converges with acute illness. Includes:

  • What happens to lung function in normal ageing?
  • Under what circumstances should oxygen be given?

12:00

Tara Quirke

The Cascade to Unintended Disablement

The treatment that older adults are subjected to when admitted to hospital can contribute to reasonably independent people becoming disabled. Not only is there a risk being exposed to a range of complications, but they are also at risk of losing their level of functioning as a result of non-specific geriatric care. Using a case study, this session will look at:

  • The cascade of events in care which can lead to unwanted outcomes and adverse events
  • What has mobility got to do with it?
  • Is routine insertion of a urinary catheter really necessary?
  • Is recovery or disablement influenced by length of stay?
  • Dehydration and malnutrition

1:00PM LUNCH BREAK


2:00

Tara Quirke

Perspective is Everything: The Case of the Older Adult

If 90-year-old Catherine Hamlin was admitted to your area in considerable pain with a fractured NoF, and was unable to articulate clearly, how would you approach her as an older woman? Would your approach change if you knew she had just been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize? One of the key factors that can impact on the treatment people receive in acute care is assumptions about age. In this session, the persistence of negative societal attitudes towards older people will be explored.

  • Why is 60 still considered 'old' if 80 is the new 60?
  • Terminology - the master of perspective?
  • Why are some older patients more acceptable in acute hospital settings than others?
  • Does the health system contribute to ageism?

3:00 AFTERNOON TEA


3:15

TBA

Managing Exacerbations of Cardiac Failure in Acute Care

Chronic heart failure is a common chronic condition that is now managed very well in the community. However, an older adult with worsening symptoms or acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) may present to an acute care environment and nursing care must be based on best available evidence, as well as principles of gerontological nursing. This session looks at the following:

  • What causes ADHF in a person with previously well controlled symptoms?
  • Acute assessment and symptom management of symptoms
  • Guidelines for the treatment of ADHF
  • Beyond the clinical management - person centred care of the older adult experiencing ADHF

4:15 CLOSE OF DAY ONE OF PROGRAM


Day Two

9:00AM COMMENCEMENT OF DAY TWO


9:00

TBA

Advocacy and The Locus of Control

As the locus of control in healthcare shifts from the provider to the person experiencing healthcare, advocacy must be a concept that is understood, promoted and embraced by nurses working with older adults. This session will provide you with a detailed insight into what advocacy means and how you can support it in your patients.

10:00

Karen Matthews

Constipation: You Get What You Give

While constipation is prevalent in older adults, it is not a side effect of the ageing process. However, hospitalised older adults run a high risk of developing the problem, especially after surgery. Often underdiagnosed and poorly managed, constipation increases the chance of morbidity and longer hospital stays. Not only is it distressing, but it also has cost implications. This session looks at:

  • What are the risk factors for constipation in older adults in acute care?
  • What are the complications of constipation which increase morbidity and poor outcomes?
  • The team and holistic approach to managing constipation

10:45 MORNING TEA


11:15

Freda Fisher

Anticoagulant Therapy: A Bleeding Problem

Anticoagulants are one of the most frequently prescribed medications in older adults. As well, the frequency of comorbid conditions and the need for antithrombotic therapy also increase with age. Older adults are at greater risk of anticoagulant-associated bleeding. This session aims to provide an update on questions regarding the appropriate use and safety of these agents. Includes:

  • Review of common anticoagulant agents - what do they do?
  • Problems pre- and post-surgery
  • Problems with just being hospitalised and change in routine

12:00

Dr Treasure McGuire

Medicines, Risk and Safety - Long-Term Prescribing for Older Adults - Is It Always Necessary?

According to NPS Medicinewise, 1 in 3 of all unplanned hospital admissions relate in some way to medicines. In addition, many people are prescribed new medicines whilst they are in hospital which they may or may not need to stay on when discharged. This session looks at common medicines and the impact they have on people when prescribed for long periods of time. Includes:

  • Which medicine types cause particular concerns when administered over a long period of time?
  • Which medicines should never be abruptly ceased?
  • De-prescribing strategies to minimise risk
  • Prescribing and monitoring medication in transitions of care

1:00PM LUNCH BREAK


2:00

Tara Quirke

The Delirium Problem: Can it be Prevented?

Delirium is a common syndrome in hospitalised older adults and is associated with increased mortality, hospital costs and long-term cognitive and functional impairment. With symptoms of delirium being shared by dementia, it can easily go unrecognised. In this session, using case scenarios, your ability to identify delirium vulnerability within an acute care setting will be tested. Includes:

  • What are the greatest risks for the onset of delirium for older people admitted to hospital?
  • Can you differentiate between the signs and symptoms of delirium and dementia?
  • Recognition of risk factors and routine screening for delirium: the 6th vital sign
  • How can delirium be prevented? The multi-component evidence for nursing management
  • The undesired outcomes of delirium

3:00 AFTERNOON TEA


3:15

Denise Simmons

Teaching an Older Adult How to Leave Hospital, Stay Home and Live a Long Life

Many older adults are keen to improve their health status and often cry out for correct information on discharge from hospital. Nurses are in the prime position at this stage to impart new knowledge to their patients. However, for a range of reasons this may not always be possible. This final session looks at ways to give new knowledge to older adults that is retained and useful. Includes:

  • What is the connection between poor discharge information and bouncing back to hospital?
  • What type of information is most likely to help an older adult in regard to illness prevention?
  • When is the best time for a person to be given new information?
  • Tips on teaching a person over the age of 80 years

4:00 CLOSE OF DAY TWO OF PROGRAM


The Goal Need for Program

The number of adults aged 65 and over who are admitted to hospital has increased significantly over the past five years. The increase in hospitalisation of adults over 85 compared to the general population in this age group is of particular concern. The fast-paced, high-pressured environment of hospital presents a challenge to nurses to ensure older adults receive safe quality care. While a number of patients of this age are agile and cognitively intact, which may suit acute hospital processes, many vary in their abilities and cognition. To prevent poor outcomes and deconditioning, bridging the gaps between specialist nursing practice in acute care and the special needs of older people is essential.

Purpose of Program

The purpose of this conference is to provide nurses who work in acute care settings with evidence-based ways to deliver care to older adults so that desired outcomes are achieved and unplanned re-hospitalisation is reduced.

Your learning outcomes:

Nurse older adults in a positive manner that critically reflects on the negative impact some attitudes and assumptions can have on their health and healing

Older patients in your acute care setting will have a care plan that is based on an appropriate comprehensive assessment which evaluates physical abilities, cognitive function, and social support

Improve the health outcomes of acutely ill older adults as a result of the integration of principles of gerontic nursing care in your practice

Nursing care of an older adult patient with a common chronic condition will be based on best available evidence

Presenters

Tara Quirke

Tara Quirke

Tara is a Registered Nurse with over 38 years' nursing experience and has held several senior management and educational positions, ...Read More

John Serginson

John Serginson

John Serginson has been a Nurse Practitioner employed in respiratory care at the Caboolture Hospital since 2010. He completed his ... Read More

Ruth Hubbard

Ruth Hubbard

Dr Ruth Hubbard is an Associate Professor in Geriatric Medicine at the University of Queensland and Consultant Physician in Geriatric ... Read More

Freda Fischer

Freda Fischer

Freda Fischer has extensive experience as a nurse educator, both in Australia and Singapore. Her qualifications include a Master of ... Read More

Treasure McGuire

Treasure McGuire

Dr Treasure McGuire is a medicines information pharmacist, pharmacologist, educator and researcher. As Assistant Director of Pharmacy, Mater Health Services, ... Read More

Denise Simmons

Denise Simmons

Denise has extensive experience in nursing people with chronic illness, as well as pain management and palliative care. Denise’s qualifications ... Read More

To Be Determined

To Be Determined

 

Karen Matthews

Karen Matthews

Karen Matthews is a Clinical Nurse Consultant and Continence Nurse Advisor for Blue Care Continence Advisory Service. She is experienced ... Read More

Title
Nursing Older Adults in Acute Care
Speciality Classification
Location
Type
Delivery
Provider Type
RTO
Duration
10 hours 45mins
Start Date
09-May-2016
End Date
10-May-2016
CPD
10 hours 45mins
Fees
$561.00 (two days)
Location
Brisbane QLD 4001
Venue
$561.00 (two days)
Posted By
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